MAA501 News Journal Entry #8: Sports and the media_Jenkins

  1. Title

Seton Hall players ban social media for 2015-16 season

  1. Article Source

Seton Hall players ban social media for 2015-16 season. (2015, October 14). Retrieved October 14, 2015, from http://www.foxsports.com/college-basketball/story/seton-hall-pirates-isaiah-whitehead-ban-social-media-101415

  1. Article Topic

Sports and the media

  1. Summary

The Seton Hall men’s basketball team has unanimously decided to forego using social media for the duration of basketball season in an attempt to limit the distractions social media may cause. This “ban” was decided upon by the team and will take place at the end of October 2015 through the season.

  1. Reaction

This idea to renew a team focus on just playing basketball is something that I think other institutions may want to consider. As we all know, there are many benefits to using social media in relation to sports and media presence; however, I am interested to see if any success can be attributed to this Seton Hall team for the decision to not use social media during the season. This event does not directly affect me, but it will be amusing to follow to see how the team does, though it may be hard to measure in comparison to teams who Tweet and teams who don’t. My takeaway: Good for them. Working in an athletic department, we have to lecture our athletes every year on maintaining an appropriate social media presence that reflects positively on the college as a whole. One less hassle for the Seton Hall athletic department. Just play basketball!

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

As we have studied the interconnectivity that social media outlets can provide, it will be interesting to see how the fan base feels towards this decision for the team to not engage in social media use during the season. If successful, who knows if other institutions will follow suit in the future?

MAA501 News Journal Entry #7: Sport economics_Jenkins

  1. Title

In College Sports it’s either about Education or Free Market Economics– Not Both

  1. Article Source

Ridpath, B. (2015, September 25). In College Sports it’s either about Education or Free Market Economics-Not Both. Retrieved October 15, 2015, from http://www.forbes.com/sites/bdavidridpath/2015/09/25/in-college-sports-its-either-about-education-or-free-market-economics-not-both/

  1. Article Topic

Sport economics

  1. Summary

In this Forbes article about the crossroads of college athletics pertaining to the economic impact and the education piece of an institution, it sparks thoughtful debate concerning the future of college sports as an enterprise. This article discusses how the current educationally-based sport development model is broken and how there is no use fixing it, but to rather start and over find “better ways to govern college sports in America.”

  1. Reaction

This is a very complex article with a thought of food-for-thought points, and the one that generated the greatest response for me was point:

-“Creating more effective academic measurements, graduation rates, and realistic initial and continuing eligibility requirements. This includes a one year residency requirement for freshman and transfer athletes who do not fit the profile of the institution within one standard deviation. This will give the institution the opportunity to provide remedial education to bring the athlete up to the standard of the institution. It is criminal to bring in an athlete and not give them the tools to succeed academically while exploiting them athletically.”

I whole-heartedly agree that some college athletes are taken advantage of and don’t really have the opportunity to further their education, but rather must perform on the field without going through the process of trying to earn a degree. Because most of us will be going pro in something other than sports, we need to ensure that college athletes have the resources and support to rightfully earn an education if so desired.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The world impact here is that the scope of college athletics could be facing some pretty hefty alterations sooner rather than later. This article really makes you see how economics leaves college athletics no choice but to make a change for better or worse. (Let’s just hope they put the STUDENT-athletes first. Because remember, they are students first.)

MAA501 News Journal Entry #6: Women in sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

NFL’s first female referee makes correct last-play call on Monday Night Football

  1. Article Source

Buzinski, J. (2015, October 12). NFL’s first female referee makes correct last-play call on Monday Night Football. Retrieved October 14, 2015, from http://www.outsports.com/2015/10/12/9517737/nfl-female-referee-sarah-thomas-correct-call-steelers-chargers-monday-night-football

  1. Article Topic

Women in sport

4. Summary

This article is about the first female referee in the National Football League, Sarah Thomas. As the article begins, “For the second week in a row, Monday Night Football came down to a dramatic ending with an official’s call determining the outcome. This time, unlike last week, the call was made properly and it’s worth noting that it was made by Sarah Thomas, the NFL’s first female official.” The author notes that he notes Thomas’ gender for one reason — had she missed the call, she would have been attacked on social media in a very sexist manner, quibbling that women shouldn’t be referees, blah, blah, blah. So it’s important to note that in her highest-profile assignment to date, with millions watching, Thomas got it right as the Steelers beat the Charhers. The same can’t be said for the male referee in last week’s Seahawks-Lions game, yet no one pointed out his gender when being critical.

  1. Reaction

People need to take a step back and remember that referees are human, and sometimes humans make mistakes. We still live in a world where gender is made an issue and unfortunately live under the assumption that because a woman is a woman, she obviously must know less about how to interpret a professional sports rule book than a man, right? Good grief. As a football fan and fellow female, it is encouraging to see a woman break through the boys’ club barrier and join the ranks of an NFL officiating crew, but I wish people could just leave her alone and not compare her every move to, “Wow! She got it right!” (Well duh, they wouldn’t have hired her if she wasn’t capable of properly carrying out her game assignment and duties to the best of her ability!)

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

On the world impact front, Sarah Thomas may just pave the wave for more women to be accepted into the athletic community as officials and referees on a professional level. Let’s hope! It’s time for some equality.

MAA501 News Journal Entry #5: Race, ethnicity and sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Minority XC athletes in high demand

  1. Article Source

Minority XC athletes in high demand. (2015, October 14). Retrieved October 15, 2015, from http://usatodayhss.com/2015/minority-xc-athletes-in-high-demand

  1. Article Topic

Race, ethnicity and sport

  1. Summary

In a feature story highlighting the challenge Woodlawn High School (Shreveport, LA) cross country coach Leon Moore has when it comes to getting athletes to come out to run cross country. As mentioned in the article, local high schools, most of which have a racial makeup that is more than 50 percent black, have a hard time finding coaches that are willing to coach for a $500 stipend. The schools that are lucky enough to have these individuals, have an even tougher time encouraging black athletes to come out and stay out. This article also points out the struggle the sport of cross country has nationwide in competition with top-tier football and basketball programs. One reason the article provides for the challenge in getting minority runners is, “Part of the reason is that it is not perceived or looked at in a positive light by their peers,” Moore said. “They hear the negative comments from their friends.”

  1. Reaction

This article speaks to race, ethnicity and sport because not only are minority athletes difficult to keep on the team for a variety of reasons, but high school peers can be so cruel and discouraging. To read the line in the piece about potential runners not wanting to run because of the perception from peers, is disheartening. It is of my belief that no one should eve feel shamed or embarrassed for doing something that they love, whether that means playing a sport or taking part in an unusual hobby. From personal experience, my high school cross country team and the cross country team at college, had a tough time recruiting runners or all kinds because they were leery of the necessary work needed to put in to be successful and just the overall judgement of the sport.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

As a society, I think we need to find a way to make cross country a more attractive sport to encourage more student-athletes to run, for distance running can have a lot of benefits, much like playing any other sport.

MAA501 News Journal Entry #4: Olympic movement_Jenkins

  1. Title

Olympic movement targets youth-centric sports for Tokyo2020

  1. Article Source

Alaka, J. (2015, September 28). Olympic movement targets youth-centric sports for Tokyo2020 – Premium Times Nigeria. Retrieved October 7, 2015, from http://www.premiumtimesng.com/sports/190713-olympic-movement-targets-youth-centric-sports-for-tokyo2020.html

  1. Article Topic

Olympic movement

  1. Summary

This article speaks to the Olympic movement as the Summer Games in Tokyo in 2020 are targeting to add five youth-centric sports (as agreed by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in the interest of getting more youth to participate in the games. For instance, mainstream sports like surfing and skateboard have been added to itinerary mainly because they are popular with young people all over the world.  According to the IOC, “The five sports will serve as a driving force to further promote the Olympic movement and its values, with a focus on youth appeal, and will add value to the Games by engaging the Japanese population and new audiences worldwide, reflecting the Tokyo 2020 Games vision.”

  1. Reaction

The potential value here is that by adding sports that are popular with the younger crowd, the Olympics in 2020 has the opportunity to increase overall interest and value in the Games. I think this is a great idea, as I would love to see softball return to the Olympics and having the participation of people of all ages if qualified, would mean a greater audience is watching. I would love to see the Olympics branch out to include more sports that today’s youth are taking part in for it creates a more well-rounded world.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The world impact here is obviously that the Olympics are at a stake, a worldly event that happens every two/four years. To combine both traditional competitions with youth-focused events could generate a wide appeal for the Games and alter the future of the Olympics in a good way. I’m all for tradition, but why not try to engage a new audience?

MAA501 News Journal Entry #3: Business of sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Five Key Trends That Are Driving the Business of Sports

  1. Article Source

Mooney, L. (2014, April 28). Five Key Trends That Are Driving the Business of Sports. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/five-key-trends-are-driving-business-sports

  1. Article Topic

Business of sport

  1. Summary

In summary, this article asks, “What’s the difference between a customer and a fan?” and attempts to answer this question throughout the piece. The article focuses on five key trends that seem to be driving the business of sports in the industry. These are:

  • Big data is changing basketball management — and the game itself
  • The rise of “smart arenas”
  • Cracking the code of even deeper fan engagement
  • Using tech for sponsorship and integration
  • Globalization of the hometown team

These trends are changing the way in which we recognize sports as a business and use technology to further engage with people.

  1. Reaction

This article relates to some of the discussion topics we were presented with over the course of this semester because trying to define and grasp a fan relationship is difficult to do. However, organizations are hungry to deepen the fan engagement level and by using technology we are now flooded with ways to cast a wider net in support of the hometown team, which is now recognized on the global level.  This was an interesting read because I believe it is in line with the direction that sports are going and how technology is aiding us in everyday in this process. I am a consumer of sports and I want the latest information on my team. As a lover of statistics, it excites me that teams are beginning to use analytics to enhance their game plans.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

On the world scale, I think the direction we are headed is that if you are not technologically “with it”, you are going to get left behind in the dust of a movement where technology and integration is at the forefront of successful and used by all who wish to take advantage of the resources now readily available online.

MAA501 News Journal Entry #2: Inequalities in sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

What Gender Inequality Looks Like In Collegiate Sports

  1. Article Source

Ross, T. (2015, March 18). What Gender Inequality Looks Like in Collegiate Sports. Retrieved September 13, 2015, from http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/what-gender-inequality-looks-like-in-collegiate-sports/387985/

  1. Article Topic

Inequalities in sport

  1. Summary

Last year, the former WNBA star Becky Hammon became the first full-time female coach in the NBA. And at the collegiate level there are currently more than 207,000 female student athletes, a 180 percent increase from the early 80s. Much of this success can be attributed to Title IX, the 1972 federal law mandating equal access for women in education, including sports. However, this article discusses how despite some progress through Title IX and other policies, female coaches and players are still significantly marginalized and undervalued and this is apparent through the start of the March Madness basketball tournament in March 2015 and how the women’s tournament is often so over-looked until perhaps the Final Four bracket comes about. The raw data that does exist demonstrates just how glaring some of the gender-based gaps in pay and prestige are. The Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act of 1994 made it mandatory for colleges receiving federal funds to make all gender-equality information about their athletic programs publicly available. Thanks to this mandate, analysts were able to crunch numbers on collegiate women’s sports from the 2013-14 year and publish them on a webpage on the data platform Silk titled “Money in Men’s and Women’s Sports.”

  1. Reaction

In the sporting world, women have made major strides both on and off the playing field—at least compared with the past– and I believe we need to do a better job of bridging the gap to promoting more equality. In this article, I was surprised to learn that  female collegiate women’s basketball players are required to wait three years longer than their male counterparts before they’re even granted the option of playing in the the professional women’s league, due to age restrictions. It still angers me to this day that women are not viewed on an equal playing level as men in sports and this flows down to how men and women coaches are perceived. For instance, why should a female coach make less money than a male coach? Ugh, I could go on and one about why the pay gap is incredibly frustrating.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The world impact is simple: women are still viewed as less than males all over the world and it’s going to take a lot to change that perception.