MAA501 News Journal Entry #15: Future trends in sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Division III– Fall Coaches Update (2015)

  1. Article Source

NCAA Resources. [NCAA Resources]. (2015, August 20). Division III- Fall Coaches Update (2015). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qB4RPyUhsmY

  1. Article Topic

Future trends in sport

  1. Summary

The content of the YouTube video consists of information gathered to update fall coaches on new rules and regulations in the NCAA. The video mostly explains compliance issues surrounding recruiting. Such as, can a recruit be interviewed during a broadcast of a school athletic event? It also involves social media use, such as detailing the three phases of time in the recruiting process and how that affects certain actions like following, friending, tagging or retweeting the social media accounts of prospective athletes. In addition, the video talks about the rules regarding athlete commitments and the signing of the celebratory form and where this can take place, as well as situations involving non-athletics staff and the ability to reply or retweet prospective student athlete tweets. Lastly, the video discusses the potential for social media regulations to be up for a vote in the near future that may change the current landscape in its entirety.

  1. Reaction

This video was something sent to all Endicott Athletics staff members by our compliance officer, (women’s volleyball coach) Tim Byram and I feel that it relates to our course because of the deeper look we took at social media and its relevance in today’s society in regards to athletes and the way in which we communicate. This event affects me because I currently work in a sports information office in a college athletics department and I deal with social media on a daily basis as part of my job description. It is important for me to know the current rules for I would hate to breach conduct and have to report an NCAA violation as we are in the swing of recruiting season.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

Social media impacts the world because information now has the ability to go viral in the blink of an eye. As coaches, administrators and athletics staff members, we need to be aware of the current standards to which we are to abide by in relation to communication with prospective student athletes. In this video, I learned more about when it is appropriate to respond and when it isn’t allowed. For the safety and privacy of athletes everywhere, this video is an important tool in learning how to effectively take advantage of social media, but to also respect the current boundaries, though change may be on the horizon to eliminate restrictions all together.

MAA501 New Journal Entry #14: Special populations in sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

JC Special Olympics athlete finds meaning in sport, organization

  1. Article Source

Ruess, B. (2015, September 27). JC Special Olympics athlete finds meaning in sport, organization. Retrieved October 5, 2015, from http://www.newstribune.com/news/2015/sep/27/jc-special-olympics-athlete-finds-meaning-sport-or/

  1. Article Topic

Special populations in sport

  1. Summary

This article was a feature story about a 34-year-old Special Olympics athlete named Derek Sandbothe. Sandbothe is a disabled man, but does not led his disability hinder his love for the game of softball. Before graduating high school and going to work at Capital Projects (a sheltered workshop for disabled adults), Sandbothe never really had had the opportunity to play sports. According to the article, “In Special Olympics, Sandbothe said he finally found a place where he was not only accepted for who he is, but embraced.”

Quote:

“Special Olympics has given me a reason to live, to be honest with you,” he said. “When I was in school, I was never really accepted, but I’m just glad that’s over and that I can actually have something to hold onto that has been a part of my life for a long time. … and now, I’m at such a level in Special Olympics that not only am I competing in sports, but I’m also volunteering and helping others. I’m learning leadership skills.”

  1. Reaction

The issue presented in this article is about acceptance of people with disabilities and the ability to include everyone, regardless of skill, in sports. In this course, we often discussed (especially in Week 5) about how special populations can be included in sports and of the various resources available. One common place for this great community building involvement to occur is through the Special Olympics. The Special Olympics are an organization that is special to me because I am someone with a big heart who enjoys seeing smiles on faces. Having participated in volunteer work with the Special Olympics while as a member of my college softball team, I have seen firsthand the positive impact an organization like this one can have on the lives of the participants. This feature story was a heart-warming reminder of the good work people in our society are doing to better the lives of others. At the end of the day, sports are competitive, but they also have the amazing power to bring people together and help embrace social differences and provide the support of a team.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The Special Olympics and other organizations that provide opportunities for people with disabilities to partner with other people to achieve a common goal of playing organized sports is something that holds great power. This story should serve as a reminder to us all that people are people, and sports can bring people together and create a new generation of leaders who feel empowered by the connections they make on and off the court.

MAA501 News Journal Entry #13: Deviance in sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Police: Florida DB Held Gun to Pregnant Girlfriend’s Head, Shot At Her

  1. Article Source

Police: Florida DB Held Gun To Pregnant Girlfriend’s Head, Shot At Her. (2015, October 14). Retrieved October 14, 2015, from http://nesn.com/2015/10/police-florida-db-held-gun-to-pregnant-girlfriends-head-shot-at-her/

  1. Article Topic

Deviance in sport

  1. Summary

A University of Florida college football player, (defensive back Deiondre Porter) was suspended indefinitely by the college for allegedly pointing a gun at the head of his pregnant girlfriend and firing a shot at her. The player was arrested on charges of felony aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill and felony shooting into or throwing deadly missiles into dwellings, as reported by Deadspin.

  1. Reaction

In this article, we learn of yet another instance where a collegiate athlete made a poor choice by pointing a gun to the head of his pregnant girlfriend. This is an example of deviance in sports because a college athlete in the spotlight for participating in college football acted on his aggression and fought with his girlfriend over an accusation of cheating. There are many examples of deviance that I could have chosen for this post, but I picked this one because of the great national debate involving gun control and the acts of violence occurring over and over again surrounding domestic abuse. I think it is very wrong that people resort to violence and threatening acts to gain control over a situation and I feel that this student-athlete should be severely punished if proven guilty because nothing is going to change in our society if the law isn’t laid down. College athletes are not exempt from the law of the land. If you make a poor choice, you will pay the price.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The impact of this story is that domestic abuse is something that continues to occur on all level. Despite many efforts to teach people better communication skills, life-threatening crisis  situations still happen all the time. For why people feel the need to be that aggressive and possess firearms, is beyond my comprehension. The world impact here is that yes, guns are still a problem, and yes, college athletes still make poor choice, though at least this time they are being held accountable.

MAA501 New Journal Entry #12: Intercollegiate sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Three Things that Could Determine the Future of College Football

  1. Article Source

Ridpath, B. (2015, October 11). Three Things that Could Determine the Future of College Football. Retrieved October 14, 2015, from http://www.forbes.com/sites/bdavidridpath/2015/10/11/three-things-that-could-determine-the-future-of-college-football/

  1. Article Topic

Intercollegiate sport

  1. Summary

This article is about intercollegiate sports because it involves futuristic thinking of the direction college football may be heading. In a study conducted by Kent State journalism professor Karl Idsvoog and adjunct professor Bobby Makar, the duo found that maintaining a budget to compete, especially at the Division I level, as well as concussion and health related lawsuits, are changing the playing field for college football now and will change it more into the future. The study is still ongoing and included a video component by Brave New Films and which includes a video component produced by Brave New Films.

  1. Reaction

To me, the most surprising part of the article, was the section that discussed the lack of inquiry by news media on the subjects that college presidents avoided speaking on, such as concussion issues and their potential threat to college football. In the study, only six NCAA Division I college presidents responded to the survey asking them this question: What is the future of football at your university? This article was an interesting read because it made me ponder the future of college football, a sport that I grew up watching and cheering on my cousin in his college days on the field. The more and more we learn about the harmful impact of concussion, the more I begin to wonder whether it’s really worth it to subject student-athletes to this risk all for the value of entertainment and economic success.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

Football in America is a big source of revenue, though with the increasing costs to sponsor the sport, who knows if college budgets will be able to sustain this sport for much longer without facing difficulties. This article opens debate for the health and safety of athletes everywhere involved with football and could spark a national discussion on where the program may be headed, though it is tough to speculate.

MAA501 New Journal Entry #11: Interscholastic sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Sports inequality at the high school level: Data reveal rich-poor divide that threatens American Dream

  1. Article Source

Mohl, B., & Patel, H. (2015, October 13). Sports inequality at high school level – CommonWealth Magazine. Retrieved October 14, 2015, from http://commonwealthmagazine.org/education/sports-inequality-at-high-school-level/

  1. Article Topic

Interscholastic sport

  1. Summary

The Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) compiles athletic participation data from public, charter, and parochial high schools across the state. Through the research given in the article, nine out of the past 10 years, the publicized narrative about the data has been the same: that athletic participation is increasing. The MIAA collected data from 376 schools across the state the of number of students participating in each sport, but didn’t account for students playing multiple sports. The average sports participation rate statewide during the 2014-15 school year was 78 percent for all 376 schools, meaning there were an average of 78 sport seasons completed for every 100 students. The state’s 10 poorest communities had an overall sports participation rate of 44 percent. The data revealed some alarming trends about how athletic participation is distributed town by town and city by city. While youth in high-income school districts are playing as many sports as ever, students in low-income communities are far less likely to participate in school athletics at all. In the state’s 10 poorest communities, the data show sports participation is 43 percent below the statewide average. In contrast, sports participation in the 10 wealthiest communities is 32 percent above the average. This rich-poor divide is interesting to note because many educators and analysts believe that participation in extracurricular activities such as sports plays a key role in academic success. Likewise, many parents see sports success as a key asset for their children when applying to college.

  1. Reaction

If municipal funding does indeed play a key role in the level of participation in sports and other extracurriculars, then a serious conversation needs to be had because the economic disparity presented here is troubling. I feel that high school athletics were a valuable part of my secondary school education experience and we need to learn how to bridge the gap between communities to provide more opportunities for all. It makes me sad that it seems that at the root of all problems, is a financial crisis. Why must money be at the centerfold of participation and upbringing?

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

In the article, the author wrote, “Fundamentally, this is about fairness. We talk about the achievement gap. What about the opportunity gap?” Riley asks. “Our kids have to have the same access to the American Dream as suburban kids do.” So in my own words, this creates a greater discussion rooted in opportunity for all and making sports more of a priority for all who wish to participate, regardless of income and where you live. We need to find a way.

MAA501 News Journal Entry #10: Coaching sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

College coaching comes with risks

  1. Article Source

DeShazo, S. (2015, October 15). DeShazo: College coaching comes with risks. Retrieved October 15, 2015, from http://www.fredericksburg.com/sports/deshazo/deshazo-college-coaching-comes-with-risks/article_07d047be-5969-5c16-94d4-6cafa9e14da9.html

  1. Article Topic

Coaching sport

  1. Summary

This article came about in the aftermath of some shift in the college coaching world. As mentioned in the article, Randy Edsall, Steve Sarkisian and Steve Spurrier had head-coaching jobs at big-time college programs with seven-figure salaries. But as of today, they are all out of work. Their circumstances varied. Edsall was fired; Sarkisian suspended, then fired; Spurrier stepped down voluntarily, saying he was “resigning, not retiring.” At the root of it all, the bottom line was essentially the same: losing too often. The main point of the article was this: “But for better or worse, big-time college sports are morphing into a version of the pros, including talk of paying athletes. That makes winning all the most critical.”

  1. Reaction

As someone who enjoys watching college football, and someone who grew up without much of a father in her life, I often looked to my coaches as figures for guidance. These men and women helped shape me into the woman I am today, and for their impact and support, I am forever grateful. This article relates to this course because it focuses on the role of coaching and points about how it seems these days that coaches ride or die on their record and results. Instead of valuing the importance of the positive impact coaches can have on our players’ lives, what seems to matter most are the wins and losses. I personally think this is very shallow. Note: I do believe coaches deserve to lose their jobs if they violate rules and are deemed not suitable for the role, but fired for just winning and losing? Ridiculous.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The potential impact this trend could have on the world is teams losing good coaches, but also coaches choosing to skip out on wanting to coach for the fear of losing their jobs and the constant pressure to produce winning teams. Sure, it’s more fun to win, but we seriously need to get our priorities straight.

MAA501 News Journal Entry #9: Youth sport_Jenkins

  1. Title

Youth Sports Burnout Driven by Achievement by Proxy Syndrome

  1. Article Source

Reed, K. (2015, October 10). Youth Sports Burnout Driven by Achievement by Proxy Syndrome. Retrieved October 14, 2015, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ken-reed/youth-sports-burnout-driv_b_8274078.html

  1. Article Topic

Youth sport

  1. Summary

According to Dr. Chris Stankovich, a sport psychology consultant and advocate for positive youth sports development, a key issue in youth sports today is players getting “burned out.” In the article, Ken Reed discusses the alarming rate that youth sports in American are seeing burnout as millions of kids nationwide are becoming both mentally and physically fatigued from playing sports too intensely, often year-round. As noted in the article, this phenomenon seems to be getting worse, and not better. Several contributing factors were included in the article: Our country’s great love of sports; increasing numbers of families turning to sports as a means of a free college education (or even an opportunity at professional sports); and parents living vicariously through their children, which is also known as “Proxy Syndrome”.

  1. Reaction

We all know the issue of overbearing parents and coaches in youth sports isn’t a new one. But, things are definitely getting worse as parents are taking the seriousness of youth sports to an extreme and it’s often negative. In the course, we spent a section discussing the impact of youth sports and the many benefits that can be derived from participation. However, this article provided an eye-opening and eye-popping experience to the number of incidents involving confrontation at youth sporting events. Note: Parents, you need to chill out! This article served as a reality check and friendly reminder for when I become a parent someday, I vow to not force my kids to play sports. I may encourage them to do so, but it will ultimately be their choice and we’ll seek to create some balance in our lives so that it could continue to be something they enjoy.

  1. World Impact (if applicable)

The world impact presented here is that parents across America need to take a step back and realize that the chances of their young athlete making it to the professional leagues is slim and that we should only encourage participation for the love of the game, lifelong friendships and good values sports can teach. But don’t push the envelope because you can cause more harm than good if you exhaust your child by forcing him or her to play when the desire isn’t really there.